The history of the collection (part 2)
Gradually collecting works of art captures a wider range of Russian nobility. Since the second half of the XVIII century, well-known private collections of counts Stroganov, princes Golitsyn, Yusupov and…

Continue reading →

"Bavarian rose" - Empress Sissi. Ceremonial portraits, drama, life (part 2)
Two years later, a son was born in the family — crown Prince Rudolf, who, of course, was immediately taken under the care of his grandmother and attracted her caregivers.…

Continue reading →

HOW THE PLAY OF COLOR IN PAINTING SETS THE MOOD
HOW TO BUY A PAINTING TAKING INTO ACCOUNT THE INFLUENCE OF COLOR ON A PERSON. Color has great energy and certainly has a strong impact on humans. As well as…

Continue reading →

Edward Lear: great artist, singer of nonsense

With the light hand of Edward Lear limericks went on his triumphant March around the world, establishing the canons of true English humor. Funny pentameters accompanied the drawings: long-nosed cranks, fat cats, dumbfounded owls … Illustrations were to match the new genre of absurdity. And who would have thought that a serious artist, a virtuoso animalist and master of landscape, “descend” to this? We tell about the remarkable artist who radiated warmth and good nature and managed to fill the world with charming paradoxes.

Edward Lear (1812 — 1888) was born in North London, the son of stockbroker Jeremy Lear and his wife Anne Clark Skerret. At a time when the main occupations of women were home Economics and the birth of children, it was not surprising that the future artist was the 20th child in the family. He was the youngest child to survive in an age without antibiotics or vaccinations. The economic turmoil of the Napoleonic wars led to the collapse of the London stock exchange, which directly affected the welfare of the Lear family. Taken care of by his older sister Ann, the boy left his father’s house at the age of 4.

Ann Lear. Portrait of Edward Lear at the age of 9. This picture has become known public only in 2010 thanks to relatives the second on seniority sister Lira-Sarah, which emigrated in New Zealand. Photo By Stephen A’court. Source.
Anne Lear, the oldest of the children, was 25 years old at the time. The younger brother became for it favorite child — she replaced Edward mother and remained near with him until its demise. Certainly conditions, in which lived brother and sister Lear, were not the most comfortable. Starting at the age of 6, Edward began having epileptic seizures, to which asthma was later added. Family troubles weighed on the boy, adding to the disease periods of depression and melancholy. But still, still… like all children, Edward saw the beauty of the world, loved nature, animals and birds. Anne, along with her sister Sarah, taught her brother to draw and gave him a primary home education.
Edward Lear. Noble green-red parrot, Australia
Noble green-red parrot, Australia
Edward Lear
1832, 55.7×37.5 cm
The grain fell on fertile soil: the boy’s eye was faithful, his hand was light, and at the age of 16 the young Lear earned by drawing for a piece of bread. “At first I painted all sorts of unusual advertising drawings for shops, which sold at a price from ninepence to four shillings, painted prints, fireplace screens and fans, and made medical drawings for hospitals and private doctors” — the artist recalled. His talent was recognized, and two years later Lear began his professional career. In 1830 he applied to the Zoological society of London for access to a collection of birds for the book Illustrations of the family Psittacidae, or Parrots.

William Derby. Portrait of Lord Edward Stanley, 13th Earl of Derby

It was a self — conceived project-and Lear had just turned 18! By all accounts, the young man knew how to win over others and really had a tremendous talent. The meeting of the Zoological society of London, which considered Edward Lear’s request, was presided over by Lord Stanley, later 13th Earl of Derby, who from his youth was passionate about books and drawings on natural history. This June day in 1830 was a turning point in the fate of the aspiring artist-his project was supported, Lord Stanley invited Lear to his estate in Knowsley Hall, where he kept a menagerie, and soon the young Edward became an associate member of the Linnean society.

Edward Lear. Illustration for the book “Illustrations of the family of Psittacid, or Parrots»
Edward Lear. “Red Heron”. For John and Elizabeth Gould’s Birds of Europe, 1832-37. Source: gallica.fr
In the Victorian era, zoos were closed and owned by wealthy people (London zoo, founded in 1828, opened to the public only in 1847), it was not easy to get there. Naturally, Edward Lear jumped at this tempting offer: where else can you see animals from around the world and draw them from nature! After finishing his book, Lear came to Knowsley, where, commissioned by Lord Stanley from 1831 to 1837, he created a series of drawings of birds and animals.
Edward Lear. Pelican. Series ” Birds Of Europe”
Pelican. Series ” Birds Of Europe”
Edward Lear
1837, 37×54 cm
Relations with Lord-patron became all more friendly: Lear lived in estate, painted (in menagerie Stanley housed the more 1,200 birds and more 300 mammals-was than to address!), and entertained the children of the Stanley family, the grandchildren and great-grandchildren of the Lord. It was for them that he began to invent entertaining short poems, which later became the famous “book of nonsense” (1846).

Edward Lear. Cover of “the Book of nonsense»
As the times wrote, “…there are two kinds of nonsense: there is boring nonsense that anyone can say or write, and there is clever nonsense, the amazing masters of which are Lewis Carroll and Edward Lear.”

The artist called his poetic exercises ” absurdities “or” meaningless rhymes ” — “nonsense rhymes”; the name” limericks ” appeared only at the end of the XIX century (it is associated with the Irish city of Limerick — the history of the origin of the fog).
Agreeing to the first edition of limericks, Lear, protecting his reputation and not knowing how the public would react, signed the book as “Derry Down Derry”. Fears were in vain — both children and adults fell in love with amusing poems with simple funny pictures, and the “book of nonsense” has survived more than one edition. Lear composed limericks all his life and continued to publish picture books. So saw the light of ” the Book of nonsense and more nonsense “(1862),” Ridiculous songs and stories “(1871),” Nonsense alphabet “and” Nonsense botany ” (1888).

Pretty lady from the Atlantic,
Tying his shoes into bows,
Know walked on the pier
With puppies spotted
And defamed the climate of the Atlantic.

To an attractive lady from Capua
Often the birds perched on the hat, and
Spoke with love
“Let it sit for health!»
That nice lady from Capua.

Day after day he beat the old man
Into the belly of a ringing brass Gong;
A terrible cry arose:
“Illegal, old man!”
The old man fell silent, crushed.

There was an old man with a beard.
He said: “I knew there would be trouble.
Two owls, three Siskin
And four Swifts
Made their nests in my beard.”

Pretty lady from the Atlantic,
Tying his shoes into bows,
Know walked on the pier
With puppies spotted
And defamed the climate of the Atlantic.

To an attractive lady from Capua
Often the birds perched on the hat, and
Spoke with love
“Let it sit for health!»
That nice lady from Capua.
Prev
Next
It was Edward Lear who practically approved the classical composition of Limerick, which is built according to the rules:
— in the first from five lines for necessarily is called blockbuster and geographical place his origin (to example- “Expansive lady from lance” or ” Simpatichnaya lady with Atlantic»);
the second tells the story of what happened to the character;
— the first line rhymes with the fourth and fifth, the third rhymes with the fourth (scheme ” AABBA»);
– the third and fourth lines are one foot shorter than the others;
– the endings of the first and last line are the same.
Edward Lear. Book of nonsense II
Book of nonsense II
Edward Lear
One thousand eight hundred seventy one
It must be said that the translation of limericks into Russian, and into any other language-it is difficult: it is necessary not only to understand and convey the meaning of nonsense, but also to rhyme it correctly, and each translator has his own vision of the problem. One of the famous translators of the works of Edward Lear, Samuel Marshak, wrote about this work: “to Translate Lear is very difficult. It is not easy to convey his varied, flexible rhythm and melody of his poems, to reproduce in another language a bizarre string of his images. Yet I worked on the translations from Lear with the keenest interest and pleasure. I wanted to convey to my readers the fun game that is the essence of Edward Lear’s poetry.”
Edward Lear. The book of nonsense. Illustrations
The book of nonsense. Illustrations
Edward Lear
1865, 26×23.5 cm

Have of the damsel one miracle-nose
Grew and grew, and until gender has matured;
So the old lady used to,
The one with the firm foot,
I hired you to wear that nose.

Miss Norfolk’s chin
It was longer and sharper than a needle.
Not at all embarrassed,
Them on harp played
The gifted miss from Norfolk.
Edward Lear. The book of nonsense. Illustrations
The book of nonsense. Illustrations
Edward Lear
1865, 26×23.5 cm

Have of the damsel one miracle-nose
Grew and grew, and until gender has matured;
So the old lady used to,
The one with the firm foot,
I hired you to wear that nose.
Prev
Next
Edward Lear’s illustrations for the book of nonsense in color

Edward Lear and his friend Chichester Fortescue. 1857. Source.

Needless to say, Edward Lear was ironic in everything, and he did not spare himself. In correspondence with His youthful friend Chichester Fortescue, Lear said that he intended to apply to the Chancellor of the exchequer, William Gladstone, to appoint him “Supreme Peripatetic Ass and Chief Gibberer” of England. A year later, he claimed the title of “Lord Keeper of State Stupidity and Supreme Nonsense.” “The book of nonsense”, aka “the Book of nonsense”, aka” the Book of nonsense”, despite the original, true English humor, has been translated into many languages and repeatedly illustrated by different artists.

Edward Lear. Caress
Caress
Edward Lear
1832, 18.7×27.9 cm
But back to the artistic incarnation of Lear. As an outstanding ornithologist and animal painter, he worked closely with another famous ornithologist and artist John Gould, and taught his wife Elizabeth Gould the art of etching. Lear also worked on the series “Birds of Europe” and “Toucans”, created a series of illustrations with turtles and British mammals.
After several years spent in the estate of Edward Stanley, the artist felt that his vision began to deteriorate, and the fine lines of lithographs he could not afford. Then he decided to become a landscape painter and entered the London Academy of arts Henry Sass. And then he went to Rome to improve his health, continue his art education and get new impressions.

"Red, red, freckled." The most famous redheads in art history
People with natural red hair color always attracted attention with their "unconventionality" - real or far-fetched. And throughout the history of art, artists from Sandro Botticelli to Dante Gabriel Rossetti…

...

The history of the collection (part 1)
The collection of Italian paintings is one of the most important sections of the Museum's art gallery: it has more than five hundred and fifty works and chronologically covers the…

...

Van Gogh's suicide: ten arguments why the murder story is a myth
Art critic Martin Bailey, a researcher of the life of Vincent van Gogh, says: a few years ago, he often asked the question " Why did the artist cut off…

...

"Frida": cinema, love, art and struggle
There are not many really good films about artists. In some cases, the creators brings too modest budget, which inevitably affects the quality. Sometimes the fault is too boring or…

...