Avdeeva Svetlana Pavlovna
Avdeeva Svetlana Pavlovna. Promgrafik. She was born on March 26, 1940 in Korolev, Moscow region. In 1969 she graduated from the Moscow polygraphic Institute. The beginning of creative work since…

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IDA O'keefe: life and oblivion in the shadow of a sister
When you hear the name O'keefe, who comes to mind? Most likely, Georgia. Her sensual flowers in pastel colors and bright paintings of desert landscapes have become iconic. But what…

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Pre-Raphaelite painting in the details on the outfits and armor (part 1)
Pre-Raphaelites in their works often turned to the theme of the middle Ages and the early Renaissance — artists were attracted by the beautiful subjects of ancient stories and legends,…

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Tableau

In the film “Frida” literally recreated several iconic paintings of the artist. This was achieved through a combination of skilful shooting and digital effects. Julie Taymor says: “I believe that it is impossible to fully understand and reveal how the artist creates. But Frida’s paintings are very autobiographical. Reading Herrera’s book, I could really understand how paintings came to be in her life, and that makes her very different from abstract artists like Pollock or Picasso. Like many people, I found her paintings frightening, eerie and eloquent, but as a Director they attracted me with their narrative content. I thought the photos and visuals that would allow these stories to unfold before your eyes would be a great addition to what would otherwise be a regular biopic.”

Shot from the film “Frida”: the real artist and her picturesque copy. “Self-portrait with cropped hair” as if enclosed in the frame of the doorway
Taymor and Prieto brought in well-known visual effects artists from Amoeba Proteus, who worked on many Hollywood projects, to work on the film. In the film “Frida” their main task was to animate the artist’s paintings and visual effects to depict her travels in America and Europe. Prieto recalls: “we talked endlessly about how to achieve this or that effect, and Julie was very receptive to ideas. The great thing is that she’s primarily a theater Director, not immersed in filmmaking, and so she can imagine rather than think, “What can we do within the constraints of film?”Julie was saying,’ This is what I would like to do, ‘ and knowing the tools available to us, I could contribute ideas and suggest things that would improve her idea. It was very interesting for me to participate at this level and help create visual concepts.”
Frida Kahlo. Frida and Diego Rivera
For the film, Prieto needed to recreate several iconic paintings by Kahlo — in particular, “Two frides”, “self-Portrait with cut hair”and” Broken column”. In order to shoot these shots, Salma Hayek was put in appropriate poses and applied makeup, which created the effect of a “painted” face. Throughout the film, the live action periodically freezes, turning into a static image of the picture, or Vice versa paintings at some point “come to life”. To achieve this effect was not so easy. “There are no shadows in Frida’s paintings and the lighting is pretty flat,” Prieto says. — I wanted to give them a little depth, but they still had to look flat. The sets to recreate the paintings were built in a forced perspective, with sloping floors. Because in the paintings of Frida perspective is almost absent.”
Frida Kahlo. Two Of Frida
By the way
One of Frida’s amazing visions was created with the help of puppet animation. This moment in the film follows immediately after the bus crash: while unconscious, Kahlo sees doctors in the images of cartoon skeletons that sort through her insides and voice a long list of her injuries. To work on this scene attracted the American film Directors-animators the brothers quay (Quay Brothers). Julie Taymor says: “I didn’t know them Before, but I loved their work. I just gave them the script, said it would be a skeleton nightmare in the style of Mexican day of the dead, and stressed that I wanted to make this scene abstract, comical, but a little scary.”

THE MOST EXPENSIVE PAINTINGS OF 2016
TOP 10 auction sales in 2016 was as follows: 10th place "Peach blossom of spring" 1982. Zhang Daxian. Sotheby's auction, Hong Kong, April 5, 2016. - 34,899 million $ The…

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EXPENSIVE LUXURY GIFTS, EXCLUSIVE GIFTS.
Speaking of luxury gifts it is impossible to ignore the paintings, which at all times were presented as significant gifts for the most important events. In the past, the picture…

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Such different Rembrandts: 5 films about the great Dutchman (part 1)
Rembrandt from the movie of the 1930-ies — rosy Joker and a bit of a klutz. Rembrandt 1970's-tacit and a gloom type of with heavy mournfully maniac. Rembrandt 2000-x-charming Zippy…

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The history of the collection (part 1)
The collection of Italian paintings is one of the most important sections of the Museum's art gallery: it has more than five hundred and fifty works and chronologically covers the…

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